Pollack Drips Look Like Question Marks

pollack-mural.jpg

For my artist friends out there, I’d love to have your input on this story on the authenticity of some recently discovered Jackson Pollack paintings of dripped paint on canvas.

Here are the questions Gene Edward Veith asks on his blog that I’d love for some artists to comment on:

“if one set of drips has aesthetic merit, why not another? Didn’t Pollack want to keep the artist out of the work? So why does the artist make such a difference?”

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2 Responses to Pollack Drips Look Like Question Marks

  1. Derrick says:

    “The detective work is intriguing, but the other question is, if one set of drips has aesthetic merit, why not another? Didn’t Pollack want to keep the artist out of the work? So why does the artist make such a difference?” -G.E. Veith

    Answer: Because the artist and his/her output reside in an (art) historical context that is more or less one component in how the work is defined as a “great piece of art.” Pollock and DeKoonig, Kline and Newman were all participants in a very important american movement in art that willingly sought a “break” with traditional modes of painting that had been established for centuries. Pollock also led that charge to extricate the art cultural capital from Paris and place it firmly in NYC where it has been up until rcently. The issue here is not about aesthetics at all but about the place of the work in an art historical context. Though Pollack was intrigued by the idea of the removal of the artist’s hand in the work he forgo that the Duchampian idea of artist intent was already too firmly established to divorce his personality from the artifacts he left behind. Practically, it is a case of cult of personality and commercial commodification in a secondary art market that is not willing to have its romper room art fairs suddenly flooded with a bunch of questionable new work from a dead man.

    In the high art world intent often trumps aesthetics (especially ideas of beauty) concerns. Conceptual viability over expressionistic modes and technical virtuosity is the normative critical position these days. I could go on and on…

  2. Scott W. Kay says:

    Ah. Follow the money trail…

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