Sola Fide?

not-faith-alone.jpg

I saw this church sign only a few miles from where our church meets. We teach that salvation is by faith alone, but this sign seems to be a fairly clear indication that these folks teach the opposite.

I suspect that Martin Luther would advise that people take greater heed to the second sign in the photo, and not cross the street to attend this church!

THE ERROR

While Scripture teaches that genuine saving faith will invariably produce the fruit of works, that’s not what this sign is saying. These folks are taking a single verse and missing the point of it, and it’s context.

Here’s what James 2:24 says: “You see then that a man is justified by works, and not by faith only.”

If you take that verse by itself, you can certainly be led to think that salvation requires works. But to take it by itself is to commit a gross error, especially since the context of the verse makes it quite clear that that is NOT what this verse is intended to teach.

Quoting it alone ike this amounts to the same error journalists make when they quote only a portion of a sentence that someone spoke, making it sound like they are saying the opposite of what they actually said. We call that misquoting.

James 2:14-16 is not a text intended to teach the basis of salvation, but to teach the marks of true salvation. In fact, the theme of entire epistle of James could be characterized as marks of genuine faith, much like the epistle of 1 John.

This church’s sign is a good example of how often James 2:14-26 is misquoted, misinterpreted and misunderstood in such a way that a defective view of grace is taught. Some good, basic hermeneutics (principles of interpretation) will help in avoiding this all-too-common error in reading this passage.

THE ISSUE

The root question in interpreting this passage is to determine what James means by “justified.”

The first thing that needs to be realized is that the terms “justify” or “justified” are used in several different ways in the New Testament, but there are really only two ways to understand this passage and justification. Your understanding of justification is the dividing line between understanding the biblical gospel of salvation by faith alone (sola fide), or the false gospels of salvation based on good works.

In other words, properly understanding justification is absolutely crucial to the Christian faith. It’s that important. So, if you misinterpret this passage, you get the Gospel wrong. Now, let’s consider the two options of the meaning of “justified” that are most relevant to this passage.

1. “Justified” can be defined as “a legal declaration that you are righteous before God.”

This is the most common way “justify” (Greek: dikaioō) is used in the New Testament.

For example, this is the meaning of the term when we read Luke 7:29, “And when all the people heard Him, even the tax collectors justified God, having been baptized with the baptism of John.” Of course, the people did not make God righteous, they simply declared that He is. This is the sense in which “justified” is used in passages where the New Testament says that those who believe on Christ for salvation are declared righteous by God (Rom. 3:20, 26, 28; 5:1; 8:30; 10:4, 10; Gal. 2:16; 3:24; etc.).

This meaning is particularly evident in Rom. 4:5: “But to him who does not work but believes on Him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is accounted for righteousness.” Here, God legally declares the ungodly to be righteous in His sight, not on the basis of their good works, but in response to their faith.

The issue at stake here is whether you believe you are justified by faith alone or by faith and works. Paul teaches that when God declares sinners to be righteous, he is not lying about them being righteous when they aren’t, but that He is declaring that they are righteous because He has graciously imputed (transferred) Christ’s righteousness to them (see 2 Cor. 5:21).

Therefore, when a person believes on Christ by faith, God applies the merits of Christ’s righteousness (His works) to them and then declares them to be righteous. It is not that person’s own righteousness, it is Christ’s righteousness that is freely given to them.

This is why Paul says in Phil. 3:9 that his goal is “that I may gain Christ and be found in Him, not having my own righteousness, which is from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith;”

This legal declaration is not based on the person’s righteousness, but on the merits of Christ’s righteousness. In other words, when God declares someone righteous on the basis of Christ’s righteousness, there is no remaining room for, nor even any need for, any additional righteous works contributed by man. This is why Paul says in Eph. 2:8-9, “For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.”

So what does James mean when he says we are justified by works?

2. “Justified” can mean “to demonstrate or show that you are righteous.”

For instance, Jesus said to the Pharisees in Luke 16:15, “You are those who justify yourselves before men, but God knows your hearts.” Clearly the point here is not that the Pharisees made legal declarations that they were “not guilty” before God, but that they were constantly attempting to show others that they were righteous by their outward acts.

Luke 10:28-29 shows us the same usage of the term. “And He said to him, “You have answered rightly; do this and you will live. But he, wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” His goal was “to show himself to be righteous” to those who were listening. Other examples of this use of “justify” can be found in Matt. 11:19, Luke 7:35, and Rom. 3:4.

This is also the way James is using the term “justified.” James 2:18 clearly shows this to the case. “But someone will say, “You have faith, and I have works.” Show me your faith without your works, and I will show you my faith by my works.”

James is telling his readers that a so-called faith that does not produce the fruit of works is not true faith at all, it is a dead faith. Works are the demonstration to others that our faith is living, or genuine, faith in Christ. Works are not the basis of being declared righteous before God. Rather, they are the proof that we’ve already been justified by God.

Works are a sign of salvation, not a means to salvation. True faith will bear the proof of good works. That’s James’ point.

James 2:21 goes on to say, “Was not Abraham our father justified by works when he offered Isaac his son on the altar?” James is referring to something later in Abraham’s life, when he sacrificed Isaac in obedience to God’s command in Genesis 22. This is long after God’s declaration of Abraham being righteous by faith alone in Genesis 15:6: “And he believed in the LORD, and He accounted it to him for righteousness.”

Genesis 15 was when Abraham was justified once for all, and he was declared such on the basis of faith alone. Paul repeatedly makes this point in Romans 4 and Galatians 3.

Genesis 22 was when Abraham was “shown to be righteous” by his works. And in that sense James says Abraham was “justified by works.”

THE CONCLUSION

How can we know if we or someone else has genuine saving faith? Their works will demonstrate it. Their works will justify their claim to be a Christian. In other words, their sanctification will demonstrate their justification.

So, the most relevant question to ask when we come to James 2 is, Who is justifying whom? Is James talking about God declaring people righteous, or is he talking about people demonstrating their righteousness?

The message of this church sign confuses justification with sanctification, and in so doing perverts the Gospel at its center, for it communicates the notion that saving faith only “works” when it is accompanied by good works, which is to add our righteousness to Christ’s righteousness in order to qualify for saving faith, which is a heresy zealously and conclusively condemned throughout the New Testament. This amounts to “another Gospel,” and as such, garners Paul’s strongest condemnation: “accursed” (Gal. 1:6-9).

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14 Responses to Sola Fide?

  1. Kyle Hedrick says:

    Scott,

    You could not be more wrong or more judgmental in your post. At a minimum, you would think that someone proclaiming to be a Christian would take the time to ask questions before judging an entire group of God’s people to Hell. Your harsh words and false accusations (of perverting the gospel) are worse than saying to your brother “raca.” I wonder how many souls you are positively affecting when you accuse and condemn while never taking the time to speak with any of these people at the Roswell Church of Christ?

    Kyle

  2. Scott W. Kay says:

    Kyle,

    You could not be more wrong in your judgmental assessment of this post and of my motives. This sign has spoken for these folks publicly. I have responded publicly, and have done so with an evangelical explanation of the passage at hand to show how it was publicly used to give a wrong impression of the Gospel. If these folks don’t believe in what the sign gives the clear impression of saying, then for the sake of Gospel clarity they should be more careful. Was Paul too harsh in Galatians 1? Because if these folks do believe in faith and works as the basis of salvation, then I’ll stand with Paul to condemn that sort of theology as a false Gospel.

  3. Kyle Hedrick says:

    Scott,

    To begin with, only one of us claimed someone has perverted the gospel. Only one of us has claimed that an entire body of God’s children is accursed. I suspect this is why your tone continues to be accusatory — and again without merit.

    Have you read all of Galatians? What about Acts 15? Paul’s indictment of the Judaizing Christians primarily concerned circumcision. To my knowledge, that is not a work of faith referred to in the book of James. Perhaps you can point out James lists circumcision a demonstration of an alive faith.

    As I read the sign you photographed to display on your blog, it is a call to a faith that works rather than belief only (which is what James says the demons do). You simply read something that was not there. Unlike what you did to the church in Roswell, I will render no judgments as to why you did this. Amazing that you proclaim such a broad statement of grace and yet, have so little for others. I will again pose the same question to you I did in the first post and to which you made no response. Prior to writing your statement of condemnation of God’s children, did you ever take the time to speak with any of them? Prior to claiming they were accursed, did you ever take the time to find out anything about them or their beliefs? Do not cower after making such bold accusations. Answer both questions.

    With regard to the passage cited from James, it is either true or false. The belief of the Churches of Christ is that the passage is truth, and that James is saying exactly what is said earlier and in the context of the book. A faith that is nothing more than a simple belief that God exists, a faith that causes no repentance, no obedience of faith — no works, is no more than that which the demons have and shudder. Even Paul speaks to the necessity of the “obedience of faith” in Romans 1:5. Saving faith is an alive faith. Saving faith brings about repentance. Saving faith is not mere belief. It is not a dead faith. You may continue in your stubborn belief that the people of the Roswell Church of Christ are accursed and perverting the gospel. I would suggest that prior to writing them off as the spawn of Satan, you may want to learn something about them first.

    Kyle

  4. Kyle Hedrick says:

    One final note: I can assure you that no church of Christ that I have ever heard of believes that you are saved by works, or a combination of faith and works. “For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; NOT AS A RESULT OF WORKS, so that no one may boast.” Ephesians 2:8-9. I do not know the people at the Roswell Church of Christ, but I have attended a church of Christ all of my life. I am a graduate of Lipscomb University (previously David Lipscomb College), and I am very familiar with the doctrines espoused by the majority of churches of Christ as regards salvation. If you really believed these people were teaching error, I would expect you to ask them down from the sycamore tree and over for dinner — not to reject them publicly to show how firmly you stand with Martin Luther on the other side of the street.

  5. Scott W. Kay says:

    Kyle,

    I already answered your questions. They spoke publicly about their view (at least they publicly gave a strong impression of what their view is), and I have responded publicly about their view. I do not need a conversation with them. Did Paul the Judaizers?

    With Paul, I publicly condemn their theology as cursed. If they do in fact hold to faith plus works in practice, even while verbally denying that they do, then they categorize themselves as a people who have perverted the Gospel. There’s no way around that, despite attempts to explain it away.

    You said:
    “A faith that is nothing more than a simple belief that God exists, a faith that causes no repentance, no obedience of faith — no works, is no more than that which the demons have and shudder. Even Paul speaks to the necessity of the “obedience of faith” in Romans 1:5. Saving faith is an alive faith. Saving faith brings about repentance. Saving faith is not mere belief. It is not a dead faith.”

    Did you read my entire post? I have nowhere denied that living faith PRODUCES works. In fact, I have strongly defended that position. I have no controversy with what you said in that paragraph, and nothing in my post does either. My post is aimed at a “gospel” that teaches that faith must be ACCOMPANIED with works in order to be justifying,

    Galatians and Acts 15 both condemn adding ANYTHING to grace alone for salvation. Circumcision happens to have been what the Judaizers were adding to faith in the apostles’ day, while some churches today add baptism, etc. The issue changes from group to group, and certainly isn’t limited to circumcision alone. But the adding of any work to saving faith (whether it be circumcision, baptism, communion, etc), or in any way requiring some act or acts to be performed in order for saving faith to be effective, is simply a false understanding of saving faith, and therefore constitutes a false gospel. That’s what that sign plainly appears to be saying, and that’s what I have a problem with. I think Paul and Luther would too.

  6. Kyle Hedrick says:

    Here, I would argue that you are misinterpreting the gospel and what “saving faith” is. Saving faith is not a faith that “PRODUCES” obedience. Saving faith IS obedience. The obedience of faith means an obedience that is a part of faith. Such an obedience of faith requires man to believe that Jesus was the son of God. Such faith INCLUDES the obedience of repentance. It INCLUDES the obedience of confession. Obviously, you believe that any time man is required to take any affirmative action, it denies the sovereignty of God. Therefore, a faith that includes repentance or confession is adding to the gospel of Jesus Christ. I reject that faith is simply a dead belief that Jesus was the son of God. I believe the author of James spoke the truth and was inspired by the Holy Spirit. I believe that faith is MORE than just a belief, but it is action. It is confession. It is repentance. It is the obedience of faith. If it is between you, or the Roswell church, as to who is teaching a gospel not in accordance with the scriptures (or what you, in your judgment, call a “false gospel”), it is the one who would maintain that saving faith does not include repentance (something man does) and faith does not include confession (something man does) as a part of justification. If you are accusing the Roswell church of teaching a false gospel for advocating that James 2:24 means what it says, if you are condemning them for teaching that saving faith is active and requires action of man including belief, trust, confession, and repentance, then they will stand condemned by you — but not by God.

    Incidentally, in response to your question: did Paul have conversation with the Judaizers? The answer is absolutely, unequivocally yes. Paul did not make assumptions and bear false witness against them. Paul did speak with them (Acts 15:2). Paul, inspired by and guided by the Holy Spirit (which you are not) did not simply assume a message, refuse to speak with them, and condemn them unbeknownst to them. He did speak with them. Admittedly, you did no such thing. Before dragging Paul onto your side of the street and holding him captive there, at least do as much as he did.

    The sign is clear: you are saved when your faith is alive — not the dead faith of the demons. Reading more into the sign than this is merely seeking fodder for a defamatory post. Even reaching your false assumptions regarding the sign, you should have at least followed the teaching of Paul in speaking with them rather than a simple labeling of false teacher.

    The churches of Christ believe that you are saved by grace through faith. Period. Nothing more and nothing less. James teaches very clearly about the difference in a dead faith and a faith that is alive. The churches of Christ believe that an alive faith includes confession, it includes repentance — it is an active and alive faith. We are saved by grace through a faith that is alive. Not through a dead faith. Otherwise, the demons would be justified by their faith.

    Now a confession on my part. First, I wish I had handled this whole thing better than I have. Including the post that appears above! I read your initial post and became very upset. My tone has not been what it should have been. Second, while I continue to defend this congregation, I am not impressed with the sign at issue. I know that churches of Christ do not believe in a works based form of grace, but I cannot deny that the sign carries a message that many may construe as pointedly contentious. I am not unfamiliar with the long history of “faith only” arguments thrown about by various faiths. Yet, I cannot be sure that the Roswell church is leveling charges until I have taken the time to speak with them. I will admit that I would not be altogether surprised if the language used was with a not so wholesome purpose. Nevertheless, I still believe that before you label someone a false teacher, rant about their “perversion” of the gospel, and write them off to Hell, you owe them a little more than mere supposition. Especially when the things you write incriminates a much larger audience.

    Kyle

  7. Kyle Hedrick says:

    Scott,

    You say, in your last paragraph, that it is a perverted gospel that “in any way requir[es] some act or acts be performed in order for saving faith to be effective.” Here, I would argue that you are misinterpreting the gospel and what “saving faith” is. Saving faith is not a faith that “PRODUCES” obedience. Saving faith IS obedience. The obedience of faith means an obedience that is a part of faith. Such an obedience of faith requires man to believe that Jesus was the son of God. Such faith requires the act of repentance. It requires the act of confession. To deny this is to deny the plain teachings of the Bible. Obviously, you believe that any time man is required to take any affirmative action, it denies the sovereignty of God. Therefore, a faith that includes repentance or confession is adding to the gospel of Jesus Christ. I reject that teaching. The book of James stands in opposition to any teaching that saving faith is simply a dead belief that Jesus was the son of God. I believe the author of James spoke the truth and was inspired by the Holy Spirit. I believe that faith is MORE than just a belief, but it is action. It is confession. It is repentance. It is the obedience of faith. If it is between you, or the Roswell church, as to who is teaching a gospel not in accordance with the scriptures (or what you, in your judgment, call a “false gospel”), it is the one who would maintain that saving faith does not include repentance (something man does) and faith does not include confession (something man does) as a part of justification. If you are accusing the Roswell church of teaching a false gospel for advocating that James 2:24 means what it says, if you are condemning them for teaching that saving faith is active and requires action of man including belief, trust, confession, and repentance, then they will stand condemned by you — but not by God.

    Incidentally, in response to your question: did Paul have conversation with the Judaizers? The answer is absolutely, unequivocally yes. Paul did not make assumptions and bear false witness against them. Paul did speak with them (Acts 15:2). Paul, inspired by and guided by the Holy Spirit (which you are not) did not simply assume a message, refuse to speak with them, and condemn them unbeknownst to them. He did speak with them. Admittedly, you did no such thing. Before dragging Paul onto your side of the street and holding him captive there, at least do as much as he did.

    The sign is clear: you are saved when your faith is alive — not the dead faith of the demons. Reading more into the sign than this is merely seeking fodder for a defamatory post. Even assuming one could reach your false assumptions regarding the sign, you should have at least followed the teaching of Paul in speaking with them rather than a simple labeling of false teacher.

    The churches of Christ believe that you are saved by grace through faith. Period. Nothing more and nothing less. James teaches very clearly about the difference in a dead faith and a faith that is alive. The churches of Christ believe that an alive faith includes acts done by men such as confession, repentance, — it is an active and working faith. We are saved by grace through a faith that is alive. Not through a dead faith with no acts whatsoever, as you would teach. Otherwise, to preach the gospel message for which you contend, is to claim the demons would be justified by their faith (belief only). While men or creeds may teach this theology, you will never find it in the Bible.

    Kyle

  8. Kyle Hedrick says:

    IMPORTANT NOTE: My internet connection messed up and sent two similar posts. Read the post from 9:32 first. Then read the last paragraph of the post from 9:19. Not really sure how this happened, but this will save you some time. The last paragraph from the 9:19 post is what I wanted to end with!

  9. Scott W. Kay says:

    Kyle,

    Thank you for your words. I appreciate the change of tone, and I am also heartened that you too can see how this sign is misleading at best, and even potentially contentious.

    It may help to make clear that I too believe that repentance is inseparable from faith. But, unlike what you said, I believe that this too is a gift from God, not a work of man (I base that on 2 Tim. 2:25), just as faith is a gift from God, not a work accredited to man (Eph. 2:8-9). I think it is an error to speak of repentance and confession as works of man that accompany saving faith. That, I believe, adds man’s works to faith.

    Yet, let me also be quick to add that I believe saving faith is more than mental acknowledgement of Christ as Savior, because, as you have pointed out, this is merely what demons do. So, what is saving faith? It is the response of trust on Christ for salvation, something demons don’t do.

    So I think we agree that saving faith is more than mental assent to the facts, but I think we disagree that while repentance is always attendant to saving faith, it is not a work of man. To make it a work of man is to not be saved by grace alone, but by grace and works. In other words, I do believe that saving faith is MORE than mere assent to the facts, I do not believe it is action.

    I was surprised, but glad, to see your final sentence admitting that your position is not reflected in the creeds and confessions of the wider church. That, I think is telling. And that would make me, for one, rethink whether my understanding of saving faith is correct, and that the rest of the majority of many generations of Christians were wrong.

    In the end, I do think we have differing views of salvation, and the place of faith and grace and repentance and works in it. I think we may use similar language, but at root, I don’t think we mean the same things.

    Thanks for your interaction on this. It’s been informative.

  10. Kyle Hedrick says:

    Thanks Scott

    Perhaps we mean closer than you believe. Maybe, we are just arguing over semantics. I will freely admit that I believe that God is sovereign. I will do my best to briefly explain what I believe about faith and grace. First, all of the work was done by Jesus Christ. There is absolutely nothing that man adds to his ability to be saved. It is a gift from God. Without Jesus Christ, there is no justification no matter what man may do. I will admit that the following is a weak example and not found anywhere in scripture. It just describes how I see things. We are lost at sea. Jesus throws us a lifeline. We trust in him completely, knowing the lifeline will bring us to safety. If we do not reach for it or take any action (belief that he is the son of God, that he was our sinoffering, that we need to repent, that we need to confess), we will perish. Of course, reaching out is meaningless if there is no lifeline. If Jesus did not do the work to send you a lifeline, you could do all the reaching and grabbing you wanted, you would still perish. Now, is grabbing and holding the lifeline a “work” in which one can boast? How many people to do you know who were rescued in such a fashion where they were celebrated as a hero? “We have a real hero with us today. John, who put everyone’s life at risk when he jumped from the bridge to commit suicide rescued himself when he reached out and attached a lifeline to his body. Congratulation John! This was bravery indeed. You saved yourself!”

    Frankly Scott, I cannot see this as being anything to boast about. I feel the same with regard to repentance and confession. I believe these are not works but they are the response of man much the same way that grabbing a lifeline is the response of man.

    This is why I say we probably agree but are getting confused with semantics. I tend to think that things like repentance and confession are more of a reaching out for a lifeline that has been freely provided to us and which will take us ashore — not because we deserve it or because of anything of our own accord. It is the simplest of acts. Jesus brought the boat out into the dangerous waters, he is throwing out the lifeline, he is reeling you in, it is he who rescues you — not you. You merely responded to his call to grace. It is by grace that you are saved. BY GRACE. Period. You are not saved by anything else. But the acceptance of that grace is through faith. Period. I can assure you without hesitation, we agree on the grace part. That we are saved by grace and not of anything at all that we do. We have “earned” nothing in responding to God’s call. We have merited nothing, worked for a reward, etc. But there is something that keeps the message from being universalism (all are saved regardless of anything). These things are man’s response to the free gift of grace. Will man believe it? Will he receive it?

    Oh well, I won’t waste anymore of your time. I enjoyed the conversation. I know we do disagree on some things. I can tell you this; while I believe faith is inclusive of things you may not believe (that through faith, I die to my old self (I don’t literally die), through faith,I am buried with Christ (though I am not actually placed into the ground), through faith, I am washed clean by his blood (though his blood never physically and literally touches my body), and I am raised up as a new creature clothed in his white garments such that I am now the righteousness of God (yet, physically, I am unchanged and I do not have on a literal white robe) — all of this is purely and simply faith. Period. Not a work of which I can boast.

    Again, I am sorry for the manner in which I approached this whole thing earlier. May we both continue to read and study the Bible with prayer and with open minds and open hearts.

  11. Scott W. Kay says:

    Kyle,

    I actually find your illustration to be a good way to demonstrate the different ways we approach the issue of salvation. I think that it provides a fast track to the root of our differing perspectives. I’ll explain.

    I would argue (though I’m not trying to be argumentative) that the Scriptures give a different view of the state of man in his unsaved condition. Rather than portraying man as drowning and thrown a lifeline, of which all he then needs to do is reach out (by faith) and take it, instead Paul says in Ephesians chapter 2 (a passage we keep referring to) and verse 1 that lost men are not drowning nor almost dead, but are already completely dead. That is, not as men drowning who are yet still alive and able to do their part in being saved, but are completely dead and entirely unable to do anything that contributes to their rescue.

    I think an illustration more reflective of this fact would be to say that man has already drowned, sunk to the bottom of the sea, and has died. What is then needed is for God to come to him in his dead state and raise him from the dead – perform spiritual CPR on him, if you will. This is how the new birth transpires whereby man is born again. Man doesn’t contribute to it in the least bit, he doesn’t reach out and take a lifeline, simply because, well, he can’t. He’s dead.

    God must give a man life before he can believe or repent or do anything else.

    So, where exactly does faith fit into this event? Faith is a gift from God (Eph. 2:8-9), along with repentance that man exercises in response to being regenerated. Before God raises him from the dead, he can do nothing. Life comes, then comes faith and repentance.

    Of course I’m sure you will recognize this as a Reformed explanation, which I am persuaded by because I think it best takes into account the full witness of the NT in regard to salvation, including man’s spiritual deadness and consequent inability to participate in his own salvation – just as in his natural birth (e.g. John 1:13).

    God does it all. He gets all the glory. Man does not play a part in bringing it to pass, in contributing his faith or repentance or anything else to make it “work.”

    Thanks for stopping in on this conversation, Kyle. Grace and peace to you.

  12. Kyle Hedrick says:

    Thanks for the explanation. It seems that our disagreement stems more from a differing view of Calvinism rather than a difference on who saves whom. I deny a “role” for man in salvation in that I claim all the “work” was done by Jesus — man simply takes advantage of that free gift by choosing to receive it. You believe that God, in our example, elected the dead people to whom he would give life based upon His pleasure (I have read some of John Piper’s outstanding books and, while he and I disagree, I get great value from his books — he is truly a gifted genius). EIther way, I think, we both agree that, man contributes absolutely nothing to the saving work of Jesus Christ.

    See you again soon on J. Mark’s blog. If you like The Message paraphrase, get it in genuine leather TODAY. For the money, it is the best layout and binding of any Bible I have ever seen!

  13. Dan C. says:

    Hello Scott,

    I attend the Roswell church and would love to discuss this with you. While I too believe in standing for truth and exposing unfruitful deeds of darkness (Eph. 5:11) I also believe in fairness, gentleness, honestly, integrity and love (Eph. 4:15, I Pt. 3:15, etc.)

    So if you have the time and want to name the place I would love to meet with you. I assure you I will not be heated or beligerent, but with humility and gentleness discuss this passage and any others with you.

  14. Allan Turner says:

    Scott,

    I hope and pray you’ll accept Dan C’s invitation. If, as you say, he and those at the Roswell church of Christ are in error, this would be the opportunity to set him and, perhaps them straight. An opportunity, if you will, to give an answer for the hope you think is in you (cf. 1 Peter 3:15).

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